Toronto Maple Leafs: How the Canucks Stack Up in Canadian Division

TORONTO, ON - FEBRUARY 29: Tanner Pearson #70 of the Vancouver Canucks battles against John Tavares #91 of the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at Scotiabank Arena on February 29, 2020 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Maple Leafs defeated the Canucks 4-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON - FEBRUARY 29: Tanner Pearson #70 of the Vancouver Canucks battles against John Tavares #91 of the Toronto Maple Leafs during an NHL game at Scotiabank Arena on February 29, 2020 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Maple Leafs defeated the Canucks 4-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images) /
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TORONTO, ON – FEBRUARY 29:   The Maple Leafs defeated the Canucks 4-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images)
TORONTO, ON – FEBRUARY 29:   The Maple Leafs defeated the Canucks 4-2. (Photo by Claus Andersen/Getty Images) /

There’s a chance the  Toronto Maple Leafs play in an all Canadian division

The COVID-19 pandemic is still running wild in the world we live in today. It has shutdown the United States-Canada border for unessential travel which includes professional sports of all kinds.

Since this is the case, if the National Hockey League does indeed end up having a season, there’s a strong chance that the Toronto Maple Leafs and all the other Canadian based teams will be placed in one division to prevent having to cross the border.

If the all Canadian division does end up happening, one of the teams the Maple Leafs will have to often face is the Vancouver Canucks.

Leafs/Canucks all time history

The Toronto Maple Leafs and Canucks have played each other a grand total of 153 different times with Vancouver having the slight advantage with an all-time record of 69-62-22. The first time these two teams faced off was back in 1971 where they split the series 3-3.

Despite the Canucks having the slightly better record, the all time series could go either way. Back in the olden days, ties were able to occur without declaring a winner at the end of the game, hence the total of 22 ties between the two teams, but this was eliminated in 2005 when the league implemented the shootout. If shootouts were a thing well before 2005, the record between the Leafs and Canucks would be a lot different.

While the Toronto Maple Leafs and Canucks play in separate conferences now, these two teams did cross paths in the playoffs in 1994 in the conference finals. The Canucks came away with the series win sweeping the Leafs in four games.